Putting Value on Health

Today I’m going to start a new series about assigning value to things that are important, and sometimes difficult to measure. I plan on calling it the “Putting Value” series.

The other day I was chatting with a co-worker, and she asked me about the new apartment I’m renting. BIG SHOCKER that I’m renting given my other rant on not buying a house.

Well, I lucked out for a lot of different reasons when looking for this apartment:

  • My house was too large for little old me so the apartment fits my needs and gives me less to clean every week
  • The location is closer to the shops I frequent, and also marginally closer to the mountains where I can do some hiking
  • I no longer have motorcycles zooming by my house at all hours of the day
  • And perhaps most importantly, the apartment has a ridiculously well-stocked gym

Now, as someone that has wasted a gym membership in the past (2 visits over 6 months) it’s foolhardy to assign a value to a gym before I use it. But the amazing thing has been that I’m actually dragging myself 500 feet at least three times a week to do cardio and muscle workouts!

Before I moved in, I did the geeky thing of trying to figure out how valuable this new apartment would be, and it looked something like this:

  • $1500 apartment value
  • $25 monthly energy savings because of smaller footprint
  • $25 free beverages and snacks in the community lounge
  • $50 free Wifi which keeps me from going to Peet’s
  • $50 pool which I can use 7 days a week to work on my backstroke
  • $50 24/7 gym access on-site

If I never step into the gym, then it has no worth.

But now that I’m working out 3-4 times a week, the gym and my health subsequently carry tremendous value.

There are thousands of articles that praise the effects of exercise on one’s energy levels, long-term health, and stress among other things so I won’t do a deep analysis into any of these. But all I really want to share is that if I had to re-do the value list for my apartment, it now reads like this:

  • $1700 apartment value (perfect in so many more ways than expected)
  • $25 monthly energy savings because of smaller footprint (spot on)
  • $25 free beverages and snacks in the community lounge (I’m tempted to raise this but $25 is a lot!)
  • $50 free Wifi which keeps me from going to Peet’s (so true)
  • $10¬†pool which I can use 7 days a week to work on my backstroke (I’ve gone once and may not go again)
  • $250 24/7 gym access on-site

If I’m going to seriously preach paying myself first and making the right value judgments, then my health is going to be worth at a minimum, $250/month or $3000/year. How’s that for putting value on health?

Sincerely,

Joseph

 

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